Going Google! An Introduction to G Suite for Education

 

WHO: Teachers that are interested in getting started with G Suite for Education (formally known as Google Apps for Education).

HOW: This tutorial video is under 20 minutes in length and is a simple introduction into the icons and options inside of Google Drive, Team Drives, Docs, and Forms. Viewers will learn how to navigate, organize, and utilize a small variety of G Suite For Education products.

WHEN: This video gives examples of how you could use G Suite in the classroom, as well as in School Administration.

Google Forms Adds Option For Quizzes

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WHO: Teachers looking for an easy way to make digital assessments utilizing Google Apps for Education.  If you have used the Flubaroo Add-on in the past, you will enjoy how easy it is to assess student responses using Google Forms now!

HOW: Teachers create a new form in Google Drive, then under the settings tab, there are now three options:

“General” which contains selections regarding restrictions, collecting username, number of responses, editing responses, and viewing summary of responses.

“Presentation” which includes Progress Bar, Question Order, Link for Another Response, and Confirmation Message.

“Quizzes” which allows the creator to make the form a quiz, select when grade is released, and what the respondents can see such as correct answers, missed questions, and point values.

After selecting to make the form a quiz, the user can now add an answer key and point value to Multiple Choice, Check All That Apply, and Dropdown style questions.  Simply click the answer key button at the bottom of the new question and there will now be an area to select point value, and also click on the correct answers to create the key (image below).Screen Shot 2016-06-28 at 11.51.08 AM

After creating the key, the teacher can also add an option for answer feedback, both for correct and incorrect answers, including links (image below).

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Once the responses to the quiz start coming in, the teacher is given great data.  Insights include Mean, Median, and Range of points, a bar graph with total point distribution, frequently missed questions, and graphs for the responses of each question.  By clicking over to the “Individual” tab under responses, the teacher can see each students quiz individually.

WHEN:  Using Google Forms Quiz selection is great for quizzes, but it could also be used for formative assessment or as an exit ticket.  You can even go back and change old forms from before, click on settings, and turn it into a quiz.

Front Row: Adaptive Math and ELA Practice

WHO: Teachers looking for skills practice for students K-8 in Math and English – Language Arts.

HOW: Teachers create an account of their own, add in classes and rosters, then direct students to log in.  When creating accounts, teachers can identify if students are primarily English or Spanish speakers.  Upon logging in and trying different domains, students will start with a diagnostic test.  Front Row is adaptive, so it adjusts to the students level.  This allows students to focus on what they need to learn first, in order to build upon previous skills to grow.  There are over 20,000 questions aligned to Common Core State Standards, and when students need help, there are videos to help guide along.  On the ELA side, the main focus appears to be comprehension, and the articles provided can be adjusted to a variety of grade levels.  Front Row provides teachers with great data in order to drive instruction.  Tracking mastery of content through standards are laid out in the reporting tool.  Front Row also works science and social studies into the questions allowing for cross-curricular connections.

WHEN: Front Row is great for independent practice or as an exit ticket option at the end of class.  Teachers may also find Front Row useful to assign as homework.  Front Row is a great tool to allow for parent involvement in the educational process. Printable instructions for creating parent accounts connected to students are a simple click away for teachers.

 

Here is an introductory video from Front Row:

Quick Start Video Tutorial: Quizizz – Engaging Digital Formative Assessment

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Original post regarding Quizizz was created on February 3, 2016.  View it here.

WHO: Teachers that are looking to move away from worksheets and paper based exit tickets.

HOW: Sign up for an account on Quizizz and get started!

WHEN: Quizizz is great for formative assessment, engaging closure to lessons, or even as homework.

Here is a tutorial video to get started with Quizizz in your classroom:

Quizizz: Engaging, Entertaining, And Competitive Formative Assessment

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WHO: Teachers in 1:1 or BYOD classrooms that are looking for formative assessment that captures students attention.

HOW: Teachers sign up for an account at http://www.quizizz.com/, choose a public quiz, or create their own, and begin!  When creating a quiz, teachers can search the public bank for quizzes and copy individual questions over to their own.  The quizzes can also have media embedded to base questions on. Each question can have up to four potential answers.  After a teacher starts a quiz, they direct their students to open a browser and go to http://quizizz.com/join/.  The students will then enter the teachers quiz code, enter their name (they will be given an avatar), and wait for the quiz to begin.  Once all of the students have entered the room, the teacher begins the quiz.  Students are able to see both question and answer on their screen instead of looking back and forth between device and projector.  Each correct answer gives the student points, and quicker answers net higher point values. After answering a question, the screen displays a humorous meme to let them know if they were correct.   At the end of the quiz, the students are given their rank for that particular assessment.  Teachers are given a graph with student scores and an option to download the results in a spreadsheet.

WHEN: Quizizz is a great formative assessment tool.  It could be used at the beginning or end of a class, or as a weekly checkup.  Teachers could also have students create their own quizzes as a way of demonstrating mastery of content.

Wizer.me – Interactive Digital Worksheets

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WHO: Teachers looking to take their worksheets to the next level.

HOW: Teachers create an account at wizer.me, create an assignment, and assign to their class.  Options to assign include Google Classroom or direct link.  Students will need accounts as well.  Each assignment is given a unique pin number and teachers also have the option to share the assignment globally.  After completing an assignment, students can receive immediate feedback if the teacher has set it up.  Otherwise, Wizer.me will grade some items for the teacher automatically, then when the teacher finishes the assessment, they have the option to send student feedback.

There are many different question types and tasks:

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WHEN: Teachers can use wizer.me as an opening/closing class activity, or as homework.  When creating an account, the system does not ask if the user is a student or a teacher, so the students are able to create these digital worksheets as well.  This is great for students to show mastery of content.

WEO: Digital Assignments With A Social Media Feel!

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WHO: Teachers looking for digital activities in the classroom.

HOW: Sign up for an account on https://www.weo.io/, create a class, add students (or they can add themselves via class code). Teachers can either create activities/assessments on their own, or search what other teachers have created.  Lessons that are Common Core aligned are easy to search for.  When creating activities, teachers can add a variety of items:

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To find activities made by other teachers, just simply click on the search icon in the corner, and type in the topic you are covering.  Teachers can create boards, “pin” activities to save for later, or assign to a class.

WHEN: Teachers could use WEO as a Bell Ringer/Exit Ticket, Formative/Summative Assessment, or for an entire lesson.  Teachers can be up and running with their first activity in a matter of minutes.

Quick introduction from WEO:

Go Soap Box: Versatile Formative Assessment For The Classroom

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WHO: Teachers looking to gather formative assessment data from their students.  This is a great option for 1:1 and BYOD classrooms.

HOW: Teachers sign up for an account, create an “event”, select which setting they wish to use, and then direct students to log in via event code.

WHEN: This tool is great to gather data before class begins, during class, or at the end to gauge student understanding.

Go Soap Box has a “Confusion Barometer” allowing students to select if they understand or are confused on the topic.  This gives the teacher a clear view at the class as a whole.  Each event has it’s own Moderation Panel, allowing teachers to turn on/off a good amount of features.

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Another great feature is “Social Q & A”, which allows students to select what questions they have.  The teacher can then see most common questions from the class and address what they need to.

While scrolling through the Go Soap Box Twitter page, it appears that customer service with them is fantastic as well.

Tutorial Video: Plickers – Tech Integration Formative Assessment Tool for the Low Tech Classroom

WHO: Teachers with limited access to technology in their classroom, but do have a smartphone.

HOW: Teachers create an account on plickers.com, print off plickers cards, create a class (add students), create questions and go!  The teacher will then open the Plickers App on their cell phone, select a class and question, then scan the room with their smart phone camera.  The app collects the data and automatically records it on the phone and computer.

WHEN: This tool is great for a quick poll or formative assessment.  Even if you have a classroom with 1:1 technology access, the students will enjoy this option as a change of pace.

Tutorial: Socrative in the Classroom, Engaging Formative Assessment

WHO: Teachers looking for an engaging tool to collect formative data in an effective and efficient manner.

HOW: Teachers create an account on www.socrative.com, create a quiz, then direct students to join their classroom.  Teacher then starts the quiz, students answer the questions, and watch the results start coming in!

WHEN:  This tool is create to capture the attention of students.  Teachers could use it at any point in class for quick questions, review games, quizzes, and exit tickets.