Teachers Try Science – Lesson Plans and Resources

WHO: Teachers looking for lesson plans and resources for Algebra, Earth Science, Geometry, Measurement, Physical Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Computer Science, and Special Needs.

HOW: Teachers sign up for a free account at http://www.teacherstryscience.org/, click on “Lesson Plans”, and sort through topic, target grade (5-12), and/or estimated time required.  Teachers Try Science will then give many options of lesson plans to try.  Many of these lesson plans also contain any resources, such as worksheets, presentation, etc..

WHEN: The summer months are a great time to start looking ahead for lessons the next school year. As teachers, we should reflect on the lessons we use, and be open to seeing what works for others.

Share My Lesson: Online Platform Share Lessons With Other Teachers

WHO: K-12 Teachers looking to share their lessons and resources with others, as well as teachers that are looking for lessons to use in their classroom.

HOW: Teachers need to create an account in order to use ShareMyLesson.  After logging in, users can upload lessons, including tagging standards, adding attachments and links, and descriptions.

Teachers looking for lesson ideas, can search by state standards, grade level, topic area and more.

WHEN: During the summer months, teachers can use ShareMyLesson to either upload their lessons to have in one area, or start looking at what other teachers are doing to enhance their own.

ShareMyLesson is great as it allows teachers from anywhere to share ideas with others.

FlipQuiz: Online Review Gameshow

WHO: Teachers looking for an easier way to make gameshow style review games in the classroom.

HOW: Sign up for an account at http://flipquiz.me/, then either start creating your own board, or search for the topic you are covering.  After creating an account, the user can choose between the free version or the paid version.  Upgrading allows the user to copy other boards, have the game keep score (must do this manually with free account), upload images, create flashcards for students, and more.

WHEN: FlipQuiz is a great option for weekly/semesterly review.  Students enjoy playing gameshows, working in teams, and competing with each other. FlipQuiz makes this process much easier, and is saved online for future use.

Teach Engineering – K-12 Engineering Curriculum

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WHO: Teachers looking for lesson plans and units for STEM classrooms.

HOW: Visit https://www.teachengineering.org/, click through the various sections, or use the search bar to go through 1,400+ lessons currently available. These lessons at aligned to a variety of standards including Common Core Math and Next Generation Science Standards. While a user does not have to sign up for an account, creating one gives the ability to save lessons into a curriculum, write reviews, and set up a profile.

WHEN: Teach Engineering is not only great for upcoming lessons in your class, but also to create course maps for the upcoming school year.  If your school is looking to start a STEM course, or specifically an engineering course, Teach Engineering is well worth your time to look through.  The best part about Teach Engineering is that it is completely FREE.

Easy Notecards: Digital Study Tool

EasyNoteCards

WHO: Teachers and students looking for digital study tools.

HOW: Visit http://www.easynotecards.com/, search for topics or even the textbook used in class, or start creating your own flashcards.  Once you have a set you would like to study, you can choose from Cards, Quiz, Matching, Bingo, or Print.  This gives students the option that works best for them, and allows the teacher to have a variety to display in front of class.

WHEN: Easy Notecards would be beneficial for whole-class review, individual review, or study tables.

Front Row: Adaptive Math and ELA Practice

WHO: Teachers looking for skills practice for students K-8 in Math and English – Language Arts.

HOW: Teachers create an account of their own, add in classes and rosters, then direct students to log in.  When creating accounts, teachers can identify if students are primarily English or Spanish speakers.  Upon logging in and trying different domains, students will start with a diagnostic test.  Front Row is adaptive, so it adjusts to the students level.  This allows students to focus on what they need to learn first, in order to build upon previous skills to grow.  There are over 20,000 questions aligned to Common Core State Standards, and when students need help, there are videos to help guide along.  On the ELA side, the main focus appears to be comprehension, and the articles provided can be adjusted to a variety of grade levels.  Front Row provides teachers with great data in order to drive instruction.  Tracking mastery of content through standards are laid out in the reporting tool.  Front Row also works science and social studies into the questions allowing for cross-curricular connections.

WHEN: Front Row is great for independent practice or as an exit ticket option at the end of class.  Teachers may also find Front Row useful to assign as homework.  Front Row is a great tool to allow for parent involvement in the educational process. Printable instructions for creating parent accounts connected to students are a simple click away for teachers.

 

Here is an introductory video from Front Row:

NotebookCast – Simple, Collaborative, Cross-Platform Online Whiteboard

WHO: Teachers that would like students to work together on brainstorming and/or creation using whiteboard space online.

HOW: Create an account on https://www.notebookcast.com, create a whiteboard, and share with collaborators using a unique code for each board.  Simple tools available such as shapes, lines, text, image insert, board capture, erase, etc.  NotebookCast is designed to also be used on tablets along with full size computers.  When creating a board, the owner sets the dimensions, which include portrait and landscape mode on iPads.

WHEN: NotebookCast is great for brainstorming projects, students creating lessons, or allowing students to demonstrate mastery of content.

Quick Start Video Tutorial: Quizizz – Engaging Digital Formative Assessment

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Original post regarding Quizizz was created on February 3, 2016.  View it here.

WHO: Teachers that are looking to move away from worksheets and paper based exit tickets.

HOW: Sign up for an account on Quizizz and get started!

WHEN: Quizizz is great for formative assessment, engaging closure to lessons, or even as homework.

Here is a tutorial video to get started with Quizizz in your classroom:

Quizizz: Engaging, Entertaining, And Competitive Formative Assessment

quizizz

WHO: Teachers in 1:1 or BYOD classrooms that are looking for formative assessment that captures students attention.

HOW: Teachers sign up for an account at http://www.quizizz.com/, choose a public quiz, or create their own, and begin!  When creating a quiz, teachers can search the public bank for quizzes and copy individual questions over to their own.  The quizzes can also have media embedded to base questions on. Each question can have up to four potential answers.  After a teacher starts a quiz, they direct their students to open a browser and go to http://quizizz.com/join/.  The students will then enter the teachers quiz code, enter their name (they will be given an avatar), and wait for the quiz to begin.  Once all of the students have entered the room, the teacher begins the quiz.  Students are able to see both question and answer on their screen instead of looking back and forth between device and projector.  Each correct answer gives the student points, and quicker answers net higher point values. After answering a question, the screen displays a humorous meme to let them know if they were correct.   At the end of the quiz, the students are given their rank for that particular assessment.  Teachers are given a graph with student scores and an option to download the results in a spreadsheet.

WHEN: Quizizz is a great formative assessment tool.  It could be used at the beginning or end of a class, or as a weekly checkup.  Teachers could also have students create their own quizzes as a way of demonstrating mastery of content.

PhET – Interactive Simulations for Math and Science

 

PHET

WHO: Teachers looking for interactive simulations to use in science and math classes.

HOW: While not required, it’s worth the few seconds to register for an account. PhET is free, but there is an option for donations to help support. The teacher can sift through the large variety of topics to find what they are currently covering in class. These simulations could be projected in front of the class to work as a whole, or posted to a classroom website for individual or small group work.

WHEN: PhET would be useful during lectures or as assigned work. These simulations allow for experiments without needing to purchase a wide variety of supplies. The embed option makes it simple for teachers to add to their LMS of choice.