PLAY4A: Convert Multiple Choice Questions Into Interactive Games

WHO: Teachers interested in an engaging platform for classroom content review.

HOW: Head over to https://play4a.com/ and select “Create A Quiz”.  You will be prompted to create as a guest or to create an account.  Add multiple choice questions and answers then share when you are finished.  You will be given a code to share with your class.  Instruct your students to head over to the same website, but they should select “Play A Game”. Next students will enter the code you have provided and choose to play as a guest or to create an account. Upon entering, students will have the opportunity to play 15 different games using the questions that you have entered.

WHEN: As it currently stands, this website does not record any results from the games being played. Due to this, I would not recommend this option for formative assessment, but rather an option to reinforce fact-based content.  As the only question type is multiple-choice, teachers are limited to low-level questions. Students will find the games to have a wide variety and engaging.

Mission US: Immersive Games for U.S.A. History

WHO: Teachers and students looking for a way to bring US History to life.

HOW: Students need a computer (I haven’t tried it out on an iPad at the time of writing this post), an internet connection, and register for an account.

WHEN: Mission US is a great option to use in class or to have students play at home.  Currently there are four options to choose from.

Mission 1: For Crown or Colony, set in 1770 as a 14-year-old in Boston.

Mission 2: Flight to Freedom, set in 1848 as a 14-year-old enslaved in Kentucky

Mission 3: A Cheyenne Odyssey, set in 1866 as a Northern Cheyenne boy.

Mission 4: City of Immigrants, set in 1907 as a Jewish 14-year-old from Russia.

Osmo: Combining Digital And Physical Learning

osmo-play-beyond-the-screen

WHO: Teachers and parents looking to make sure screen time is educational.

HOW: Osmo is available for purchase online at https://www.playosmo.com/en/order/?cc=us or at select retailers.  The starter kit includes a base, Tangram, and Words for $79 and the Genius kit adds Numbers as well.  You need to create an account for Osmo in order to start using the apps.  There are five apps available in the App Store; Masterpiece, Newton, Numbers, Words, and Tangram.

Masterpiece: Students learn how to draw while working on hand-eye coordination.  Users can make drawings that already exist in the app, or take a picture where they are at.  The app will then convert the picture into lines.

Newton: Students can draw lines on a piece of paper or incorporate items they have around them.  The goal is to make the balls bounce into the goal.

Numbers: Students are given a math problem and soon they discover that with multiple ways to get the correct answer.  Students will then learn that they can be creative to get answers to the questions.

Words: Students can play individually or against a partner.  Pictures are put on the screen with missing letters at the bottom.  Students put the letters in front of the iPad in order to solve the riddle.

Tangram: Students use the shapes provided to solve puzzles in the app.

 

WHEN: Osmo is great for station work.  Students will quickly be fully engaged in using Osmo, they will feel like they are playing a game instead of learning.  Osmo also offers lesson plans for teachers looking to include it in class, view them here: https://www.playosmo.com/en/schools/

Math Games: Engage K-8 Students With Skill Building Math Games

math helper logo

WHO:  Teachers looking to engage students in math content.

HOW: Without creating an account, a user could select a game, standard, or skill, and start playing within seconds. Accounts allow students, parents, and teachers to track progression of skill mastery.  Games and skills are Common Core aligned.

WHEN: Math Games would work well in a station setting, enrichment activity, test prep, and more!

Here is a breakdown of all the features:

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SumDog: Interactive, Engaging, Competitive Math Games To Master Common Core Standards

sumdoglogo

WHO: Teachers looking for a way to engage students in practicing math.

HOW: Sumdog can be used independently by students.  However, teachers can also create an account, class, and view student progress.  Students are able to compete in a variety of games that allow them the practice they need to strengthen their math skills.  Students also are rewarded with coins that can be used to purchase “pets”.  Click here to learn more about how Sumdog builds these math skills.

WHEN: Sumdog would be great for enrichment, after a lesson, or at-home practice.

Sumdog uses the “Freemium” model, while they do offer many great tools and games for free, you will want to take a look at their pricing page to see what else is available.

Arcade Game Generator – ClassTools.net

classtools

Who:  Teachers who are looking to make assessments interactive and engaging for students.

How: This is another wonderful tool from ClassTools.net.  Teachers simply add in their questions.  Then students choose from 5 game types to play.  These games are better suited for word bank style questions.

In Manic Miner students are given a question at the bottom of the screen.  Possible answers are bouncing around the screen. The goal for students is simple.  Avoid obstacles, hit correct answers, collect a key, and jump into a toilet.

In Wordshoot the question is displayed at the bottom of the screen.  Students must shoot the correct answers with a limited amount of ammunition.  Answers will move around on the screen, becoming more difficult as the student progresses.  Each level becomes increasingly difficult.

In Cannonball, a question is given at the bottom of the screen.  The answers are on separate platforms.  Students must move a cannon into position.  Then change the angle, hold down space to build up velocity, then fire.

In Matching Pairs, students have a tabletop with upside-down cards.  In Memory game style students must find the question and answer cards that match.

In Flash Cards, the students are displayed two cards and a “give up” button.  As if they were using flash cards, students answer before looking.

When: These activities are fantastic for a multitude of classroom options.  Teachers could use the games while they take attendance.  If there is time at the end of the period, teachers could use it to review.  Teachers can embed the game on their class webpage or LMS for students to play at any time.

The tools over at ClassTools.net are outstanding.  During your planning period, it is worth your time to check out all the site has to offer.  There is certainly something for every classroom!

Direct Link: http://www.classtools.net/_mobileQuiz/index.php


Click here for larger version

Pac-Man – Transform your test questions into an arcade game!

classtools

Who: Teachers looking to make their assessments interactive and engage their students.  Also great for students to demonstrate their knowledge by creating a game.

How:  Teachers take multiple choice style questions and type them into the interface.  ClassTools.net then creates the Pac-Man game with your questions.  To begin playing, students must correctly answer a question.  Each time they lose a player, they must answer a series of questions correctly.  Students are unable to start their next turn without answering correctly.  The game ends when a student answers incorrectly, then their name is recorded and posted to the High Scores to compete with their classmates.

When: This tool is great for a bell ringer, review activity, or for student use on their own.   ClassTools.net provides a unique link and embed code for teachers to share.  Post the game to your class website, blog, or in your schools LMS.

Activities like these are fantastic tools to replace classic worksheets.  Students have engaged in the game and want to answer more questions to play more.  This is a great form of positive reinforcement with correct answers.  This also pushes students towards repetition of facts.

Direct link here: http://www.classtools.net/pac/

Here is an example of one using history questions: