Quizizz: Engaging, Entertaining, And Competitive Formative Assessment

quizizz

WHO: Teachers in 1:1 or BYOD classrooms that are looking for formative assessment that captures students attention.

HOW: Teachers sign up for an account at http://www.quizizz.com/, choose a public quiz, or create their own, and begin!  When creating a quiz, teachers can search the public bank for quizzes and copy individual questions over to their own.  The quizzes can also have media embedded to base questions on. Each question can have up to four potential answers.  After a teacher starts a quiz, they direct their students to open a browser and go to http://quizizz.com/join/.  The students will then enter the teachers quiz code, enter their name (they will be given an avatar), and wait for the quiz to begin.  Once all of the students have entered the room, the teacher begins the quiz.  Students are able to see both question and answer on their screen instead of looking back and forth between device and projector.  Each correct answer gives the student points, and quicker answers net higher point values. After answering a question, the screen displays a humorous meme to let them know if they were correct.   At the end of the quiz, the students are given their rank for that particular assessment.  Teachers are given a graph with student scores and an option to download the results in a spreadsheet.

WHEN: Quizizz is a great formative assessment tool.  It could be used at the beginning or end of a class, or as a weekly checkup.  Teachers could also have students create their own quizzes as a way of demonstrating mastery of content.

Fantasy Geopolitics: Fantasy Sports and Global Current Events Come Together!

fantasygeo

WHO: Teachers looking to engage students in global current events.

HOW: Teachers act as league administrators.  Students study countries before draft day, then take turns picking countries.  Each day a score is given for each time a country is mentioned in the news.  Just like a fantasy sports team, students can trade countries, or pick up unused countries.  The teacher sets the number of days that the competition will run.

WHEN: This would be a great group project for a world history class, government class, current event class, etc..  Some student respond very well to competition, as this may be what it takes to get some students interested in the global world.

Fantasy Geopolitics is free for 1 Administrator and 0-5 players. For pricing information beyond that, click here.

Below is a great introduction video to better explain how Fantasy Geopolitics functions:

 

All Can Code – Run Marco: Engaging Activity Teaches Coding To Anyone

All Can Code Run Marco

WHO: Teachers, parents, and students interested in learning the basics of coding.

HOW: Simply go to https://www.allcancode.com/, click on Play Demo, and get started! It is also available on iOS, Android, Chrome Web Store, and Kindle Fire.  All Can Code is also working on a comprehensive system that will allow schools to create their own levels, publish to students, and assess performance.

WHEN: This is great for technology classes looking to teach students the basics of coding.  It will help students develop the skill set to solve problems logically, as well as teaching algorithms, loops, etc.

When I started to play the game myself, I found that before I knew it, I was playing level 10, counting steps, and fully engaged on how to solve the task at hand.  Head on over to https://www.allcancode.com/ and give it a try yourself!

Brain Rush: Adaptive Games to Engage Students in Content

brainrush

WHO: Teachers that are looking for ways to engage students in classroom content.

HOW: Sign up for a free account (you can use your Google account), add students, assign games, and enjoy!

WHEN: These games would be great as a formative assessment tool, interactive classroom activity, homework, or for extra material for students looking to get ahead.

It took less than 1 minute to have me engaged in an activity on the western United States.  The game I played was perfect for recognizing the geography of the western United States.  The game kept track of my mastery, and invited me to step up to the next level when it deemed I was ready.  The library of content is quite extensive:

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Brain Rush is worth your time to check out, many students will find in fun and exciting!

Class Dojo: Engaging Positive Classroom Management

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Who: Teachers looking for an interactive and engaging avenue for classroom management.

How: Teachers create classes and student accounts.  Students can create their own avatars and earn points.  Teachers can use their computer or a smartphone to address student behavior in the classroom.  Students will recognize the positive point and negative point sounds over time.  Students will strive for positive behavior to gain points and badges.

When: Teachers can use Class Dojo throughout the entire day.  The addition of the app allows teachers to address behaviors while escorting their class through the hallway, or outside at recess.  Class Dojo takes the classic behavior scale on the wall and digitizes it.  Teachers can also use the program for parent communication.  Another option many teachers do is reward the class when they reach a certain point total.

Class Dojo is a great tool for teachers at all grade levels.  While the avatars may seem geared towards younger ages, older students will enjoy the “game-like” atmosphere this adds to the classroom.

Introduction video from Class Dojo:

Arcade Game Generator – ClassTools.net

classtools

Who:  Teachers who are looking to make assessments interactive and engaging for students.

How: This is another wonderful tool from ClassTools.net.  Teachers simply add in their questions.  Then students choose from 5 game types to play.  These games are better suited for word bank style questions.

In Manic Miner students are given a question at the bottom of the screen.  Possible answers are bouncing around the screen. The goal for students is simple.  Avoid obstacles, hit correct answers, collect a key, and jump into a toilet.

In Wordshoot the question is displayed at the bottom of the screen.  Students must shoot the correct answers with a limited amount of ammunition.  Answers will move around on the screen, becoming more difficult as the student progresses.  Each level becomes increasingly difficult.

In Cannonball, a question is given at the bottom of the screen.  The answers are on separate platforms.  Students must move a cannon into position.  Then change the angle, hold down space to build up velocity, then fire.

In Matching Pairs, students have a tabletop with upside-down cards.  In Memory game style students must find the question and answer cards that match.

In Flash Cards, the students are displayed two cards and a “give up” button.  As if they were using flash cards, students answer before looking.

When: These activities are fantastic for a multitude of classroom options.  Teachers could use the games while they take attendance.  If there is time at the end of the period, teachers could use it to review.  Teachers can embed the game on their class webpage or LMS for students to play at any time.

The tools over at ClassTools.net are outstanding.  During your planning period, it is worth your time to check out all the site has to offer.  There is certainly something for every classroom!

Direct Link: http://www.classtools.net/_mobileQuiz/index.php


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Prodigy Math Game – Engaging Math Activity

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Prodigy Math

Who: Teachers looking to engage students in Common Core Math curriculum.

How: Prodigy Math works on any web connected device.  Teachers create an account for themselves, then create students accounts.  Teachers then can create assignments by selected the Common Core standard they are covering.  Students log in and create their character, learn how to play, and start playing.  Students battle with other characters and can only attack when they answer correctly.  Prodigy gathers data from the answers to report back to the teacher.  Student achievement and target areas of growth are displayed for teachers.

When:  Prodigy math is perfect for enrichment, station work, or even as homework.  As long as there is a web connected device, students can play the game.

The interface to Prodigy is user-friendly. Teachers can be up and running with their first assignment in ten minutes or less.  While the game is free, students will be informed that they will level up quicker with a premium account.

According to Prodigy:

“for every minute a child uses Prodigy at school, the average student will spend an additional 1.5 minutes at home, voluntarily! That’s 150% more practice, without using up any extra time at school.”

Create your classroom account today at: http://www.prodigygame.com